Tag Archives: inspiration

A Home That Sparks Joy- Marie Kondo

Leelee-Sobieski

Lesson #1: Tackle Categories, Not Rooms


I’d always tackled clutter by room—take on the office first, the bedroom next. Instead, Kondo’s first rule is to tidy by category—deal with every single one of your books at once, for example, otherwise they’ll continue to creep from room to room, and you’ll never rein in the clutter. She advises beginning with clothing, since it’s the least emotionally loaded of one’s things (books come next, old photographs are much later), so as soon as I found a free afternoon, that’s exactly what I did.

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Getting nostalgic over old letters or distracted by sweet toddlers might be a temporary high, but it won’t get you anywhere fast.

Lesson #2: Respect Your Belongings


With my eyes now open, I realized my closets had hit rock bottom. Everything had succumbed to a mixed-up messiness. Kondo asks that you consider your clothing’s feelings: Are they happy being squashed in a corner shelf or crowded onto hangers? Are your hardworking socks really thrilled to be balled up? It had sounded out there when I read it, but suddenly my clothes looked totally miserable.

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Kondo warns that you shouldn’t show your family the discard bags, since they’ll want to stop you from getting rid of so much. Case in point: Henry tried to nab an old hat

 

Lesson #3: Nostalgia Is Not Your Friend


As I started emptying the closets, I opened boxes filled with letters and old photographs. Serious mistake. Kondo knows what she’s talking about when she insists you put blinders on and focus only on the category of stuff at hand. Read one old letter, and suddenly you’re down a rabbit hole of nostalgia.

To be honest, I was probably procrastinating. In theory, I was sold on the idea of living exclusively with clothing that gives me joy, but I still had hang-ups: What will I be left with? Will I have anything to wear to work? Will I have to sacrifice beloved things, all for the sake of decluttering?

Then my 18-month-old son, Henry, wandered in, and there’s nothing he loves more than recluttering. The afternoon was basically lost. If you do this, don’t waste time like I did (and maybe book a babysitter for this project).

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While she doesn’t go for the classic storage pieces, Kondo loves a good shoebox (or any pretty box you have tucked away) for its all-purpose organizing power.

Lesson #4: Purging Feels SO Good


From then on, I followed Kondo’s advice to a T. I gathered every piece of my clothing and put it in one giant pile. While I normally tidy my clothes only when I’m on a long phone call—distracted from the task at hand—today I wasn’t even supposed to listen to music. Channeling Kondo, who says a prayer upon entering a client’s home, I lit a candle, said a little prayer, and started digging through the mountain of clothes.

Once I got to work, it was so much easier and more fun than I’d thought. This question of joy gives you permission to let go of off-color shirts bought on sale, dresses past their prime, skirts that always clung uncomfortably. I realized I had many things that seemed great in theory but weren’t actually my style—they’d be better on someone else’s body or in someone else’s life (examples: an überpreppy skirt or a corporate-looking jacket).

Six hours later, I’d filled 12 bags with non-joy-giving clothes. Instead of panic, I felt relief—12 times lighter. It also felt like good karma: The best stuff went to a consignment shop, and the decent stuff went to a charity thrift store, off to see a new, hopefully better life.

 

Lesson #5: Fold, Don’t Hang


Once you’ve sorted out the things to discard—and only then—you can decide where the remaining things should go. Rather than folded in a cubby or hanging in a closet, Kondo thinks a lot of our clothing would be better off (or as she’d say, happier) folded in a dresser.

I hadn’t been using a dresser at all before, but now, having begun with four overflowing closets, I was down to enough clothing to fill one closet and one dresser. Pulling from the tops, pants, and scarves now destined for the dresser, I started folding using Kondo’s special technique.

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Here’s the basic KonMari vertical fold, which can be applied to everything from T-shirts to stockings. First, make a long rectangle, and then fold from the bottom up into a little package.

Lesson #6: THE Fold!


Kondo’s vertical folding technique makes everything easy to spot and hard to mess up (you aren’t jostling a whole pile every time you take something out or put something back). Folded this way, clothing looks like fabric origami, ready to line your drawers in neat rows.

To keep these little folded packages standing at attention in the dresser, Kondo suggests using shoeboxes as drawer dividers. A smaller box is perfect for square scarves, a deep one can go on a bottom drawer for sweaters.

The dresser install, using a few shoeboxes. I even folded some of my husband’s striped shirts (on the left), just to inspire him to try this in his own drawers.

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Lesson #7: Fall in Love with Your Closet


This is why people become evangelical about the KonMari method. Once you’ve cleared away the clutter and put things away, your dresses and skirts—the fun stuff, let’s be honest—can see the light of day. There’s breathing room between pieces, so you no longer have to do that awkward arm wrestle with the racks. All of which means you get a hit of joy—even hope!—just opening your closet, whether you’re getting ready in the morning or planning a party ensemble.

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Kondo advises hanging clothes so that the line along the bottom slopes upward—it adds an optimistic zing.

Lesson #8: Rediscover Your Style


For years, I’ve worn the same rotation of easy-to-grab, reliable pieces without dipping into all the color in my closets. And there’s a lot of it—maybe because I grew up near the ocean, I have a weakness for turquoise and pink and love a color mash-up and summertime prints. I’d almost forgotten about these colors in the daily race to get out the door.

 

https://www.onekingslane.com/live-love-home/marie-kondo-book-declutter/

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SHALL WE JOURNEY TOGETHER?

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Anna Lomax The Queen Of Kitsch!!

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Anna Lomax

Maker and collector, working within the field of Creative Direction and Set Design from still life through to large scale sculptural installation.

Born and bred in South London and currently working in East London, fascinated by the bizarre and off-key, pop-culture, folk art, pound shops and collecting. Intrigued by inventions, colour, movement and scale. Celebrating a sense of playfulness and humour through placing unlikely objects, textures and colours in to new environments.

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JIM O RAW COOL ART

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James O’Raw is a screen print artist based in East London. He works inbetween London and Birmingham where he is a member of Birmingham Printmakers Studio. He works closely with ‘People of Print’ and specialises in CMYK process printing using fluorescent inks and glow in the dark pigments. James is one half of Bridge Unltd which is a t-shirt printing company who use eco friendly discharge inks.

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http://printclublondon.com/artist/jim-o-raw/

Mademoiselle Non!

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The legendary one-time étoile ballerina of the Paris Opera Ballet turned avant-garde dance master Sylvie Guillem has worked with some of the greatest choreographers of the modern age, and this week she appears in a unique collaboration with three of the most eminent: Mats Ek, William Forsythe and Jiří Kylián. 6000 Miles Away is already being hailed as a masterpiece by insiders and it promises to be a transcendental masterclass in the language of dance from the 45-year-old dancer famed in her youth for a rebellious streak that earned her the industry nickname Mademoiselle Non. In person the CBE-holding dancer is as formidable in character as her lean, toned muscular body, although her eyes and quick smile belie a profound depth of humility and humanity – after all, this is a woman who has shunned celebrity her entire life, despite being widely considered one of the greatest artists of her generation. In this rare interview with John-Paul Pryor the revered boundary-defying dancer and choreographer discusses her drive, her discipline and her penchant for saying non.

What would you say drives you to continually push yourself in your art form?
I think it comes from my personality. I’m still a kid trying to be astonished by things. I have kind of this curiosity to learn, and I’m always learning something new. It’s always about putting myself in danger – putting myself in an uncomfortable situation for a while – and that’s very rewarding because it’s always a step forward. I am used to a routine and discipline as well, of course, because that’s the base of what I do, but if I was not able to go out of that or to use it as a springboard then I would be bored. My problem with dance is that it can follow a recipe that is very efficient but it is only a recipe. In that instance, it will be good but it won’t be excellent – it won’t be exceptional, it won’t be extraordinary.

What made you leave classical dance and move towards the avant-garde?
I have had quite a long career and for a while I was kind of dependent on the image I had, and the specialty I had, so I was responding more to demand. Once I had done everything I had to do in classical, I decided that I could spend more time on going towards people, and I wanted to do that more than doing something that I was trained to do. That’s what drives me – to go towards people and to spend time with them, giving them the opportunity to really understand that I am open to a lot of things, and that I really want to discover what they have to teach me.

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You’ve worked for some incredible choreographers, – what’s the push-and-pull like creatively between the choreographer and the personal expression of the dancer?
It depends. Some choreographers like a lot of involvement and improvisation – a lot of proposition. Then you need to really put yourself in danger to show an opinion; show a will to try things that might not be accepted. Others have a very particular idea, and in that case you step more towards their idea of things. With Billy (William Forsythe) it’s a lot of exchange – a lot of participation, a lot of involvement physically and mentally because it’s quite complicated choreography. When you work with Matts it’s more about his way of saying things and doing things, and you are translating that into physical shape… into a shimmer. They are different but what they have in common is that it’s their own thing. That’s what I’m looking for – people who have their own way of saying things. You can meet a lot of choreographers with this or that award, but when you look at what they do, it doesn’t talk to you, doesn’t say anything, doesn’t go anywhere – it has no vision, no special language.

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Without that vision is it impossible to transcend into something truly profound?
Well, the work has to be personal, otherwise there is no involvement – you are not there, you are just reproducing something that is not yours, and you are not yourself when you are doing it, so, what is the point? It might be very nice to look at but there is no going towards someone, and no one will receive it. There is no exchange with the audience if it’s not personal, if you don’t have your identity in it. Honesty is really a pure thing and on stage who you are as a person comes across so much. Whether you are doing classical or modern dance, it’s about your choices – your choices of how to do things, how you find your information, how far you go into the work, how far you push the discipline, how much you fight against limits.

Why do you think society so readily applies the term rebel to people who do their own thing?
It’s a very easy sticker to put on someone. In the field I was involved in when I was young the discipline is so hard and there is a kind of a code, and everything has its role inside the box, but to be able to follow that and to be happy within those constraints – those rules – you need to be driven by your dream. I was never driven by a dream. I was never driven by being a ballerina and that gave me a wider opportunity of choices. The Paris Opera Ballet became an open door for me – it was not an arrival point, it was the departure point. The rules that were ruling that system were not for me – what was important to me was that I was experimenting. I had a strong instinct, and was kind of animal in my reaction when someone was telling me: ‘You have to do that!’ If for me it was not relevant or had no purpose I was like, ‘No. I’m sorry. If you want me to do that only then take someone else because I won’t be happy.’ It was already the start of me making a choice. That’s when I started to have problems because a dancer is usually a quite disciplined person and when you ask her to do something she does it. But I realised very early that I did not have a lot of time and I didn’t want to lose time doing things that didn’t matter to me. That’s why I started to say no to things, and for the classically minded people it’s not the way to do things – so, to them you are a rebel.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmMaNQBED8Q

http://www.anothermag.com/art-photography/1204/sylvie-guillem

DIVINE DANCE AND CULTURE! THE MOST BEAUTIFUL DANCER & CHOREOGRAPHER IN MY EYES!

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The choreographer Pina Bausch was an intensely serious exponent of the neo-expressionist form of German dance known as Tanztheater. She was known for works showing men and women engaged in endless, often violent, power struggles. She died June 30, 2009, at 68 in Wuppertal, Germany.

The 1984 United States debut of the Pina Bausch Tanztheater Wuppertal at the Brooklyn Academy of Music electrified audiences and spurred American dancers to audition for her. Her troupe returned to BAM in December 2008 with “Bamboo Blues,” a dreamscape that switched between episodes of sensual impulsiveness, catwalklike audience-awareness, scenes of harrowing need or anxiety and aspects of melancholia.

Referring to “Bamboo Blues,” the Times dance critic Alistair Macaulay wrote, “Perhaps the most interesting dichotomy lies between its presentation of the intensely social self (in which her characters’ artful awareness of an audience often makes them become bizarre or grotesque) and its images of the less affected but often more driven inner person.”

Ms. Bausch said of her own attitude toward dance-watching: ”I want to feel something, as a person. I don’t want to be bored.” Feeling, in fact, was paramount in Ms. Bausch’s work, and nowhere did she experiment with emotions more typically than in her penchant for repeating scenes and gestures. Over the years, her stagings included dancers splashing through pools of water and flip-flopping on mounds of dirt.

Ms. Bausch was the spiritual daughter of two mentors, Kurt Jooss, the German Expressionist choreographer, and Antony Tudor, the English-born choreographer whose dance-dramas at American Ballet Theater remain the models for psychological ballet.

Born in 1940 in Solingen, Germany, she studied in Essen at the famous Folkwang School, whose dance department spawned the Jooss Ballet. That company burst upon the international scene in 1932 with Jooss’s most famous work, ”The Green Table.” An anti-Nazi, Jooss left Germany in 1933, but he returned after World War II to head the Folkwang dance department again. Miss Bausch graduated from the school in 1959 and at the age of 18, became a special student at Juilliard in New York.

Mr. Tudor, who was her teacher there, recruited her for the Metropolitan Opera Ballet. She also appeared with the American modern-dance troupe of Paul Sanasardo and Donya Feuer, and in the New American Ballet, which was actually made up of modern dancers like Donald McKayle and Paul Taylor. In 1962, Miss Bausch returned to West Germany to join Jooss’s new Essen Folkwang Ballet.

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/pina_bausch/index.html

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LnUesmL-1CQ watch this amazing dance, feel this amazing dance!

Love you Pina Bausch, thank-you for opening the doors to a new dimension

Melika Emira Baccouche

CHRONIC PAIN AND INTENTION!

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Ahimsa: The art of none-violence towards all living beings! Intention is powerful!

Leaving Montreal for a smaller town named Sutton. I needed to get out of the city after being with an addict for a year. I needed to leave the hospital’s, the addiction clinics, the pharmacy’s and all the judgment you receive when you are an addict. Addiction to me is simply an unbalance and sadly medication takes you on a ride further and further from your true self. When the intention was to retrieve your life and your true self to begin with. I could not watch him suffer on top of more suffering and suffering.

The sad thing was, prescription medication does not fall from the sky. When those who prescribe do not want to take responsibility for their decisions as a professional, it fucking sucks! Complete your circle, you are dealing with a human being and a life.

I did not want Jason to be judged, he had gone thru enough pain in his life, including self-inflicted pain. When you are suffering from old wounds or new wounds that have never been honoured. Some people start self-medicating. He had developed chronic pain and was prescribed all these medications by doctors and even pain specialist. The pain specialist was clear about the fact that with methadone, is nervous system was “mooch” as she said it herself, from what I understood, Jello

When your nervous system is mooch, pain can simply be present because of a nervous system disorder. The more you take, the more you need and the more your brain and your body tells you that this is what makes you feel better. Seeing the one I loved become thin, sicker and sicker with all these medication. I did not judge and I did not try to intervene because it was his process and his life. I respected what he needed to go thru and realize on his own. Being abandoned by his family and friends, I just wanted to guide him to a better place. Detox was the only option because every step I decided to walk with him, I knew that I was powerless over him and his decisions.

When we are in pain on a daily basis, the only thing you desire is to find your old self. The happy self that you were. Without the experience you can’t even understand the future impact on your body, your mind and your soul. Sometime’s medication is a band aid solution, specially for chronic pain patients. The more you take, the more you need and the more your inner void feels empty.

My personal feeling on addiction is that as you keep self-medicating, the bigger your inner void becomes. The real issues are ignored. You feel numb, your inner drive leaves you, you get so many after effects on your body that you end up needing your own little pharmacy.

Doctors are in the top percentage of drug addicts and when you check surveys, they would not prescribe most of the things they permit themselves to prescribe to patients, to their family and friends. If you know your drugs, you know that pharmaceutical drugs are the best. They are pure and you can’t find this quality of drugs on the streets.

The thing that makes me the most sad is that most patients are in full trust when it comes to their relationship with their doctor, psychiatrist, anyone with a P.H.D.. If a psychologist tells you that you are depressed after a 5 minute questionnaire. You might start feeling depressed because of the trust and the belief that you put into your health care practitioner. Placebo effects are strong, belief is strong, the mind is connected to the body and much of our beliefs will sink slowly into our body. With emotion’s and thoughts being inter-connected , when we feel something it is hormones receiving a message from your nervous system. We are an organic machines to doctors but we are so much more than that as individuals.

We forget that health practitioner’s are human and they are flawed as well. The error is human right? Most of these people  are over worked. When you are out of balance, how can you help someone find their own inner balance and health? When anyone and everyone is tired and has a lack of sleep. We all get into an automatic mode and we might not be fully aware of the impact we can have on someone’s health when we are a burned out. This includes what we say, what we do and how we proceed in our action’s. This is normal and it is human but this is where I wonder, if are medical system is so sick and flowed, how can we truly help patients in their suffering without any band-aid solutions?

In Ayurveda, when you prescribe a client anything, you must test it properly on yourself first, to empathize fully with the effects and the dosage for each individual client. Money was not given to any Ayurvedic doctor in the past because money corrupts. Health and money do not go well together because it has a strong effect on the intention towards healing. The simple intention must be seeing the person as a person just like us and we have become numbers in the medical system.

We are so much much more then that and to me, we are spiritual beings living a human life, being human is a gift, spirituality and the interconnectedness is a gift and having a physical healthy body is a gift!

Sending love!

My love finding love in pain:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJ8dr1nGqiw

Author: Melika Emira Baccouche

IM HERE: A LOVE STORY IN AN ABSOLUT WORLD!

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I’m Here_Robot Sheldon

I wanted to share this beautiful short film by Spike Jones.

I adore this short movie! It is a true work of art and a reflection of consciousness, mindfulness, vulnerability, including the art of sharing inspired by love.

https://https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OY1EXZt4ok/watch?v=6OY1EXZt4ok

Enjoy the beauty!

Melika Emira Baccouche