Tag Archives: creativity

Carl Jung on the Shadow

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I guess we’re all two people. One daylight, and the one we keep in shadow.
— Bruce Wayne/Batman, Batman Forever

My remarks: Being modern, one of American civilization’s greatest weaknesses is its naivete in regards to the dark side of human nature. This reality gets conceptualized in different ways, as for example “the fallen nature of man” and “sin” in Christianity, “yin and yang” in China. This deficit in our culture owes in great part to the Enlightenment, a movement that emphasized a narrow understanding of reason, a reasoning which gives an inadequate account of how we “access” the deepest truths of human existence. Carl Jung is a great bridge for we Westerners to a way of life which can, after all, help us access those truths. A necessary step in this direction, however, is a confrontation with our self. Jung calls the dark side of the self “the shadow”.

Portrayals of the shadow in art: Darth Vadar in Star Wars. The Joker, in The Dark Knight. Mr. Hyde, in Jekyll and Hyde.

Woman Blasts Martian - Mars Attacks Archives card #80 (1994) original painting by John Bolton

From The Portable Jung, edited by Joseph Campell.

Whereas the contents of the personal unconscious are acquired during the individual’s lifetime, the contents of the collective unconscious are invariably archetypes that were present from the beginning. Their relation to the instincts has been discussed elsewhere. The archetypes most clearly characterized from the empirical point of view are those which have the most frequent and the most disturbing influence on the ego. These are the shadow, the anima and the animus. The most accessible of these, and the easiest to experience, is the shadow, for its nature can in large measure be inferred from the contents of the personal unconscious. The only exceptions to this rule are those rather rare cases where the positive qualities of the personality are repressed, and the ego in consequence plays an essentially negative or unfavorable role.

The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort. To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge, and it therefore, as a rule, meets with considerable resistance. Indeed, self-knowledge as a psychotherapeutic measure frequently requires much painstaking work extending over a long period.

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Closer examination of the dark characteristics – that is, the inferiorities constituting the shadow – reveals that they have an emotional nature, a kind of autonomy, and accordingly an obsessive, or, better, possessive quality. Emotion, incidentally, is not an activity of the individual but something that happens to him. Affects occur usually where adaptation is weakest, and at the same time they reveal the reason for its weakness, namely a certain degree of inferiority and the existence of a lower level of personality. On this lower level with its uncontrolled or scarcely controlled emotions one behaves more or less like a primitive, who is not only the passive victim of his affects, but also singularly incapable of moral judgment.

Although, with insight and good will, the shadow can to some extent be assimilated into the conscious personality, experience shows that there are certain features which offer the most obstinate resistance to oral control and prove almost impossible to influence. These resistances are usually bound up with projections, which are not recognized as such, and their recognition if a moral achievement beyond the ordinary. While some traits peculiar to the shadow can be recognized without too much difficulty as one’s own personal qualities, in this case both insight and good will are unavailing because the cause of the emotion appears to lie, beyond all possibility of doubt, in the other person. No matter how obvious it may be to the neutral observer that it is a matter of projection, there is little hope that the subject will perceive this himself. He must be convinced that he throws a very long shadow before he is willing to withdraw his emotionally-toned projections from their object.

Let us suppose that a certain individual shows no inclination whatever to recognize his projections. The projection-making factor then has a free hand and can realize its object – if it has one – or bring about some other situation characteristic of its power. As we know, it is not the conscious subject but the unconscious which does the projecting. Hence one meets with projections, one does not make them. The effect of projection is to isolate the subject from his environment, since instead of a real relation to it there is now only an illusory one. Projections change the world into the replica of one’s own unknown face. In the last analysis, therefore, they lead to an autoerotic or autistic condition in which one dreams a world whose reality remains forever unattainable. The resultant sentiment d’incompletude and the still worse feelings of sterility are in their turn explained by projection as the malevolence of the environment, and by means of this vicious circle the isolation is intensified. The more projections are thrust in between the subject and the environment, the harder it is for the ego to see through its illusions. A forty-five year old patient who had suffered from a compulsion neurosis since he was twenty and had become completely cut off from the world once said to me: “But I can never admit to myself that I’ve wasted the best twenty-five years of my life!”

It is often tragic to see how blatantly a man bungles his own life and the lives of others yet remains totally incapable of seeing how much the whole tragedy originates in himself, and how he continually feeds it and keeps it going. Not consciously, of course – for consciously he is engaged in bewailing and cursing a faithless world that recedes further and further into the distance. Rather, it is an unconscious factor which spins the illusions that veil his world. And what is being spun is a cocoon, which in the end will completely envelop him.

One might assume that projections like these, which are so very difficult if not impossible to dissolve, would belong to the realm of the shadow – that is, to the negative side of the personality. This assumption becomes untenable after a certain point, because the symbols that then appear no longer refer to the same but to the opposite sex, in a man’s case to a woman and vice versa. The source of projections is no longer the shadow – which is always of the same sex as the subject – but a contrasexual figure. Here we meet the animus of a woman and the anima of a man, two corresponding archetypes whose autonomy and unconsciousness explain the stubbornness of their projections. THough the shadow is a motif as well known to mythology as anima and animus, it represents first and foremost the personal unconscious, and its content can therefore be made conscious without too much difficulty. In this it differs from anima and animus, for whereas the shadow can be seen through and recognized fairly easily, the anima and animus are much further away from consciousness and in normal circumstances are seldom if ever realized. With a little self-criticism, one can see through the shadow – so far as its nature is personal. But when it appears as an archetype, one encounters the same difficulties as with anima and animus. In other words, it is quite the relative evil of his nature, but it is a rare and shattering experience for him to gaze into the face of absolute evil.

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http://www.practicalphilosophy.net/?page_id=952

AYURVEDIC & YOGA THERAPY

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According to Ayurveda, India’s traditional medical system, each one of us has an inborn constitution, or prakriti, that shapes our bodies, minds, and predilections. Most yoga teachers know at least a little about Ayurveda and have some notion of the basic constitutional types (doshas) of kapha, pitta, and vata. According to the Ayurvedic Practitioner Swami Shivananda, the Sanskrit word “dosha” literally means “that which becomes imbalanced.” This reflects the Ayurvedic belief that people of different constitutions, left to their own devices, often make lifestyle decisions—and choose yoga practices—that tend to put them further out of balance. Ayurveda also holds that people of different constitutions are prone to diseases that reflect the ways the doshas become imbalanced.

The Stable Kapha
In Ayurvedic thinking, kapha is associated with the earth and water elements. Think heavy and stable. Kaphas tend to be strong, with tremendous endurance, but they also tend toward laziness. Kaphas are more likely than people of other constitutions to be sedentary. Kaphas are prone to depression, mucus-forming conditions such as bronchitis and sinus infections, and Type 2 diabetes (the kind associated with being overweight). If they take care of themselves, though, Ayurveda says they are also likely to live longer than people of other constitutions.

If kaphas do yoga, they are likely to choose gentle styles or restorative classes, things that feel good but don’t challenge them too much. Anyone can benefit from relaxing yoga, of course, but to get the full benefits of the practice, kaphas usually need to be encouraged to work harder and do more. Inertia—that is, the tendency to stay still if you’re not moving, and to stay in motion if you’re already moving—is the operative principle of this dosha. Sandra Summerfield Kozak, coauthor with David Frawley of Yoga for Your Type: An Ayurvedic Approach to Your asana Practice, has found that 15 minutes of vigorous activity at the beginning of practice sessions is often enough to get students out of the so-called “kaphic slump.” After that, they may be energized and ready to give it their all. Similarly, if you can motivate kaphic students to do a challenging practice regularly, they may be able to stick with it, and that can make a huge difference in their mood and overall health.

The Passion of the Pitta
Pittas are typically passionate and highly intelligent, but they are also prone to anger and aggressiveness. Think of Type A personalities. People of this constitution—in which, according to Ayurvedic teaching, the fire element dominates—are more likely to develop inflammatory conditions such as lupus, skin eruptions, and heart disease. Many heart attacks, for example, happen in the aftermath of an angry outburst or other high emotions.

If pittas do yoga, they are often drawn to challenging practices, such as vigorous vinyasa classes, or to conceptually-oriented styles, such as Iyengar yoga, and they can get competitive about their yoga. Even though relaxation is what they need more than anything, they often resist it because they think it’s not a good use of their time (in fact, time urgency is one of the hallmarks of the type A personality). One of the challenges of working with people of this constitution is to get them to back off, try less hard in the poses, be less achievement-oriented when they do yoga, and build relaxation into their routines. They often benefit from just the styles of yoga and practices that many kaphas gravitate toward.

Vata in Motion
Vatas tend to be creative and high-energy, in constant motion, but easily distracted. According to Ayurvedic teaching, in vata dosha the air and space elements dominate. Vatas are more likely to develop conditions such as anxiety, arthritis, and diseases of nervous system. Constipation and insomnia are common complaints.

Vatas tend to choose active, movement-oriented classes. They are less likely to be happy in classes in which the flow is broken up for too long to discuss philosophy or explain the subtleties of anatomical alignment. Due to their restless minds, some vatas may have a hard time with slower, more meditative practices. At the beginning of a practice session, vatas may benefit from flowing poses, such as multiple sun salutations, to burn off some steam. Afterward, grounding practices, such as standing poses held for a minute or longer (depending on the student’s level), can help reduce vata. Some vatas are drawn to vigorous pranayama practices such as bhastrika, kapalabhati, and fancy ratio breathing with long breath retentions. Unless they’ve gotten themselves well-grounded first, however, these practices can put them even more out of balance.

Going Deeper
In reality, the Ayurvedic understanding of constitutions is much subtler than what I’ve described above. Each person has elements of all three doshas, so reducing a student to a single type will always be an oversimplification. Furthermore, prakritis like vata-pitta, in which two doshas are balanced fairly evenly, are common; and a few people are tridoshic, meaning they’ve got a more or less even balance of all three. People may also manifest temporary imbalances (vikruti) that do not reflect their underlying prakriti. For example, people of any constitution who undergo the movement, disruption, and stimulation of travel may find their vata getting out of whack. That, according to Ayurveda, is why insomnia and constipation are so common when you’re on the road, and why travelers may benefit from vata-pacifying routines.

Ayurveda is a very deep well, and I believe that yoga teachers and therapists should make this field part of their ongoing study. In addition to the perspective it provides on yoga and yoga therapy, Ayurveda as a form of complementary medicine relies upon a broad array of tools including herbs, a variety of massage and bodywork practices, the multiday detoxification ritual known as panchakarma, and even surgery, although Ayurvedic practitioners tend to start with simple dietary and lifestyle interventions. Learning more about Ayurveda can help you better practice yoga therapy, and you may discover in the process that you also learn more about yourself.

http://www.yogajournal.com/article/teach/ayurveda-and-yoga-therapy/

What Self-Loving People Do Differently

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I used to look at people who were successful, healthy and happy, wondering, “What’s their secret? Why can’t I do that?”

After a decadelong struggle with eating disorders, addiction, and self-loathing, I realized that the reason I couldn’t be happy like the people I envied was that I didn’t love myself and they did.

For me, shifting from self-loathing to self-love has been profoundly healing and epiphany-inducing. I can hardly believe how simple it’s been for me to quit smoking, eat well, exercise daily, find a loving relationship, and have the career of my dreams. And it’s all thanks to self-love.

Now, I see happy people and I smile, knowing that their lives are products of a series of habits that support their relationships with themselves.

Here are seven things that self-loving people do differently.

1. They listen to their emotions.

Most people spend their lives doing one of two things to their emotions: numbing or venting. Often, they do a combination of the two (i.e. they numb until they can’t hold it in anymore, then they explode).

Self-loving people do something very different — they accept each emotion as a piece of communication and they try to decode it. This way, emotions can become important guideposts on the journey of self-discovery, rather than annoying roadblocks.

2. They choose responsibility over blame.

When something negative happens, self-loving people will look for a way to take responsibility, rather than searching for someone to blame. They know that placing blame doesn’t solve the problem — it only cultivates anxiety and helplessness. By choosing to take responsibility, self-loving people do themselves the favor of encouraging change and acceptance rather than stewing in stagnation and suffering.

3. They feed their passions and talents.

Every person in this world feels the gentle tug of fascination toward some hobby or activity. Sometimes that tug isn’t so gentle! Self-loving people learn to recognize that inner longing as something important, and they devote their time and energy to nourishing those desires. Self-loving people do something every single day that they love doing, and they allow themselves the space to explore new interests that arise. They know that nourishing their own inner hunger is much more important than any fears they might have about what feeding it looks like.

4. They spend time alone.

Those who have unhealthy, abusive relationships with themselves often have an intolerance of being alone. The moment they have some space with themselves, they feel the incoming discomfort of self-defeating thoughts and toxic emotions, so they reach for the phone or the vice. Self-loving people do the opposite. They look forward to their time by themselves, just as you’d look forward to a date with a beloved friend. They not only make time for themselves, they start to miss their time alone if they don’t take it.

5. They sleep on it.

As we learn to respect ourselves, we become more long-term oriented. Instead of caving to momentary impulses and immediate gratification, self-loving people will sleep on it and weigh the outcomes of important decisions. Paradoxically enough, being able to delay gratification and think about long-term outcomes gives us the ability to enjoy our lives more in every single moment, because that “long-term” that we’re always thinking about becomes our entire way of life.

6. They teach people how to treat them and walk away if they cannot.

Those who deny themselves love, respect, and approval will inevitably seek those necessities from other people. When we base our relationships with others on approval-seeking and love-hunger, we’re not really respecting ourselves or other people. We’re just running each other dry.

That’s why self-loving people approach relationships from a place of self-sufficiency. They know what they need to feel respected and they know what they have to offer. They gently teach the people around them about their boundaries and, if those are crossed repeatedly, they have the courage to walk away.

7. They admit their mistakes.

Those who don’t have self-respect are always measuring themselves against some outside standard. In many cases, that standard is being “right.” They feel good when they’re right and crestfallen when they’re wrong, because their whole sense of identity is wrapped up in these labels. Self-loving people tend to identify with more permanent parts of their experience, rather than temporary states like right/wrong, old/young, happy/sad. They feel a deep, unconditional acceptance of themselves, which gives them the power to practice self-improvement without losing self-love. Thus, they not only admit when they’re wrong, they expect to be.

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-16425/what-self-loving-people-do-differently.html

3 Principles for Accepting Yourself and Being Authentically Happy

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“Happiness is really a deep harmonious inner satisfaction and approval.” ~Francis Wilshire

It is only in the last few years of my life that I have felt genuinely happy and comfortable in my own skin.

Until my early thirties the dominant feeling I carried around with me was one of extreme social awkwardness. Which is strange, because most people who knew me prior to that time would have described me as a confident guy who got on with just about everybody.

I’m aware that outwardly I was very skilful at presenting a positive and socially pleasing demeanor, while on the inside feeling anxious and exhausted from keeping up the act.

This wasn’t just at work or at parties, it was rife in my closest relationships too—with my friends, my family and, most bizarrely, with my fiancée.

Perhaps the reason I was so well liked by so many is because I would agree with just about everything anyone said, so I was no bother to them. In disputes, I’d take both sides. I was always the first to offer a hand when someone needed help, but not because I felt charitable; I just wanted them to like me more.

If I got angry or frustrated, which I did often, you would never have known it. You would have seen someone who appeared unflappable, regardless of the circumstances. If I was hurt, let down or disappointed, my lightening reflex was to smile and say, “That’s okay!”

Somewhere along the line I had developed the philosophy that my happiness was dependent on theapproval of others.

This meant that my level of contentment was proportionate to how pleased I thought others were with me moment to moment. Of course, the problem was that I rarely thought they approved of me enough, so I was rarely happy.

Now that I think about it, some of my earliest memories involve me trying extremely hard to be a “good boy,” to do what I was told, and how lonely it felt to fall out of favor with my parents.

I never thought about what I wanted from life, only what would make others want to have me around.

The ultimate price I paid was my authenticity, which I now know is fundamental to a truly satisfying and fulfilling life. Not only is authenticity vital for your relationships with others, but more importantly for your relationship with yourself.

Isn’t it funny how the strategies we use to protect ourselves from our deepest fears are often the exact same strategies that manifest our fears into reality?

One day my fiancée announced that our engagement was over. She said that she cared for me deeply but that she just didn’t know who I was; there was nothing real for her to connect to. I was devastated but not surprised. It was one of the worst and best days of my life.

I walked away from our house taking nothing with me. I quit the job I hated with nothing else to go to. I was broke, lonely, and finally having to stare my exposed vulnerabilities in the face.

Shortly afterward, I found myself walking along a beach contemplating suicide. Not because of theending of the relationship, but because of the ending of my identity. I hated the mask I had been wearing and what it had cost me, but I didn’t know what to replace it with.

Obviously, I didn’t take my life. Instead I moved to London. I was scared and confused but I was convinced that a new environment would be conducive to reinventing myself.

I didn’t invent a new me. I found the real me.

I read countless books on personal and spiritual growth, attended dozens of workshops, got coaching and training, and even began to write about and teach what I was learning. I started to feel more alivethan I had ever felt before. For the first time in my life I was truly happy and being authentically me.

I want to share with you three of the most important principles that I’ve learned about authentic happiness. I hope they inspired you.

1. We live the feeling of our thinking.

As William Shakespeare famously wrote, “Nothing is either good or bad but thinking makes it so.”

Being authentically happy starts with the realization that you are both the source and the cause of your own well-being.

We never get to experience the world as it really is; we only get to experience our thoughts about the world. It wasn’t actually other people’s disapproval that made me unhappy; it was my mistaken belief that happiness is something that comes from outside of me in the form of approval.

Even when it looks as though your emotional state is being dictated by your circumstances, that is never true. Your thoughts are the root of your emotions. Just get curious and ask yourself, “If I weren’t thinking this way, how might I feel differently?”

2. Everything good is inside.

We each walk around with two versions of ourselves. One is our unconditioned self, which is innocent, flawless, and untouched by any trauma, criticism, or injustice we may have faced in life. The other is a learned self, more commonly known as the ego.

The primary role of the ego is to separate you from the truth of who you really are—a human being who is already complete, whole, and mentally and spiritually healthy. The ego believes that happiness is attained through material success, achievement, striving, earning, and deserving. I’ve often heard it described as “everything good outside.”

But your unconditioned self is the much bigger, wiser you. It already knows that you are what you seek; that real happiness is what naturally happens when you dare to show up unedited.

All the happiness you have been looking for outside of you can finally be yours when you stop chasing and start choosing.

3. Our relationship with ourselves determines our relationship with everything else.

One of the standout moments on my journey of self-discovery was hearing Dr. Robert Holden say, “No amount of self-improvement can make up for any lack of self-acceptance.”

Every time I had tried to improve the persona I was presenting to the world, I moved further away from the inner satisfaction I was seeking. As soon as I started treating myself with more kindness and compassion, everything in my life got better.

The more we are willing to love ourselves, in all our messy glory, the less we go searching for happiness in the wrong places. When we are comforted by our own self-love, we no longer need to find comfort through external fixes.

Forgiveness is key. Start by forgiving yourself for all the times you have allowed your ego block your joy. And understand that the only reason you need to forgive is to restore yourself to the authentically happy person you are here to be.

http://tinybuddha.com/blog/3-principles-for-accepting-yourself-and-being-authentically-happy/

THE POWER OF WORDS!

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Dear friends,

I feel inspired today to share some ancient well-known wisdom.

My brother is highly none religious and the most scientific and perfectionist person I know. He shared something with me many times and it highly resonated with my mind and my heart.

One day, I had made a mistake and I called myself stupid.

He reprimanded me and told me NEVER, EVER, to call myself stupid and to let go of diminishing my self-worth with words. In his philosophy, this would eventually connect with my mind. He told me that this had changed his life and had helped him improve his self-esteem and his life through the subconscious mind. He told me that our mind is like a computer and we re-inforce our thinking threw words. Words effect the way we think on a much deeper level that we can even be consciously aware of. Not only does it effect us but it effects others.

Since I have been reading the Autobiography of a Yogi from Yogananda, I have noticed the way a a Guru speaks to his disciples. The subconscious mind and the vibrations of word are much stronger than we think. The power of a Guru or a teacher is great, we are completely in awe of their accomplishments and we become very open to their opinions and words. If someone you trust and admire expresses to you that you are AMAZING, you feel amazing. Maybe sometimes you will even believe it deeply because it comes from someone of admiration.

I encourage kind words from your mouth, beautiful predictions for your future and to simply be mindful of the power of words. Dr. Anita Sharma expressed in our Ayurvedic classes many time; Turn your tongue 10 times before your speak.

To me this is a metaphor that applies on many levels in our lives. We are so much more powerful and beautiful then we know or that we could ever imagine. I wish for all of you to let go of the negative and jump into gratitude. Do not waste energy on useless people or useless conversation. Express the good and the bad but be aware of what you are truly saying. Don’t keep the negative emotions inside express!! But don’t stay in a repetitive negative hamster wheel. This is the ego that does not want to turn the attention to the heart and the soul. Be aware that there is a way to transform a negative into a positive. You can do this the moment you have come to peace with any situation and you are ready to look inside.

I personally always ask myself the question: Why am I really angry or sad? What button did this person push to affect me in this way?

Often my answer is, expectation! I expected something else, these are my emotions and no one has the capacity to hurt me but myself. If I had no expectations; how can the pain or hurt touch me? We must first respect our own self if we want others to respect us. We must give the same amount of unconditional love and space for freedom to others, as the amount we wish for ourselves. Love is space, love is space to be yourself and when you give yourself this gift, you will more and more allow others to be themselves.

We must allow others to make mistakes or be who they are fully and truly. Just like we must practice self-forgivness, we must look at others as our mirrors. They deserve the same forgiveness, there will never be the perfect conclusion you want in any relationship or the definition of a perfect relationship. We are made of different stripes and we have so much to learn everyday. Let go of the negative and sprinkle your magical words everywhere. It will change the way you live and it will change the way you think. As a self made gift by your own efforts, a nice feeling will be living in your heart at all times. Be humble with yourself and others. This is the only way to grow, learn and constantly let go to allow space for new energy.

Words by Yogananda

Words saturated with sincerity, conviction, faith, and intuition are like highly explosive vibration bombs, which, when set off, shatter the rocks of difficulties and create the change desired….Sincere words or affirmations repeated understandingly, feelingly, and willingly are sure to move the Omnipresent Cosmic Vibratory Force to render aid in your difficulty. Appeal to that Power with infinite confidence, casting out all doubt; otherwise the arrow of your attention will be deflected from its mark.

“After you have sown in the soil of Cosmic Consciousness your vibratory prayer-seed, do not pluck it out frequently to see whether or not it has germinated. Give the divine forces a chance to work uninterruptedly.”

— Paramahansa Yogananda
Self-Realization Fellowship Paramahansa Yogananda-small background texture imageScientific Healing Affirmations

“As one uses different affirmations, his attitude of mind should change; for example, will affirmations should be accompanied by strong determination; feeling affirmations by devotion; reason affirmations by clear understanding. When healing others, select an affirmation that is suitable to the conative, imaginative, emotional, or thoughtful temperament of your patient. In all affirmations intensity of attention comes first, but continuity and repetition mean a great deal, too. Impregnate your affirmations with devotion, will, and faith, intensely and repeatedly, unmindful of the results, which will come naturally as the fruit of your labors.”

— Paramahansa Yogananda
Self-Realization Fellowship Paramahansa Yogananda-small background texture imageScientific Healing Affirmations

Raymond Biesinger ART WORK Montreal based artist!

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I initially found this artist at Puce Pop Montreal. I needed to study my anatomy for my Ayurvedic classes and I found his pieces amazing, so I bought a couple and have themes framed.

I love the way he thinks in many layers and has a sociological approach to most of his art work. Very architectural and very unique. 

Enjoy the weirdness!!

LOVE LOVE LOVE

Melika

MEN’s HEALTH
Find below a full-page illustrated chart for Men’s Health showing the correct paths of the endocrine system between your organs, triple fact-checked by a real and accredited endocrinologist. All here is accurate except for the tiny offices and maybe the scale of the testes, which I’ve heard are typically not knee-width. Made for the magazine’s June 2010 issue and reprinted in the German edition.

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“MALE & FEMALE ANATOMY”

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“FELINE ANATOMY”

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NEON

This couple grimaced as full-pagers in the Munich magazine NEON, demonstrating what it was like to be under 25, unemployed, deregulated, and nihilist. Inside their faces we can find ecstasy pills, a joint, misc. German politicians, German cities, anger, violence, wine, television, cigarettes, etc.

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KMAGASIN.se

If your Swedish lessons are going well, you could drop by Kmagasin.se and find these two illustrations in their natural habitat. If those lessons aren’t going too well, just trust me when I say these two accompanied an article about the medicinal value of music in Karolinska Universitetssjukhusets Magasin’s 1.2014 issue. Above we see Dr. Victrola in her examination room diagnosing a young woman. Below we see we another woman taking her daily dose of notes. I spent an unreasonable amount of time on her earrings, but I think she’s a fox and deserves that kind of treatment. Art direction by Markus Hillborg.

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the WALRUS

A full-pager for the Walrus’ December 2012 issue, one that accompanied an Evan Fraser and Andrew Rimas piece titled “How to Feed Nine Billion.” Almost every selection in the above broken Global Food Systems Inc. vending machine is culled from the article itself. Special thanks to art director Brian Morgan for suggesting the fist-shaking ladder-climber. I’m great at forgetting the human touches.

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SOMA

Find above and below two full-page images made for Soma’s Spring 2011 issue, on the topic of artificial organs, past and present. The top illustration is one of my all-time favourites. The bottom was originally constructed as a quarter-pager but a happy accident saw it expand to a complete sheet. I’m a big fan of illustrating construction cranes and treadmills, FYI.

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LUCKY PEACH

This cutaway illustration shows the Washington State University-Mount Vernon Bread Lab, and it accompanied a “Science Team 3000” article about said agriculture and cooking lab in the Spring 2015 issue of Lucky Peach. At top left we see the “concept” room where instructor Dr. Stephen Jones is showing a few students how weird, old wheat is superior to new, refined wheat. Then we see the gene splicing room, production room, testing room, and up top a few other technicians are surveying, plowing, and noting the surface. Art direction by the skilled Walter Green.

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LUCKY PEACH

This pleasant little vignette shows the French dietary scientist Jacques le Magnen in his kitchen lab in 1956, and he’s discovering the “smorgasbord effect” via the study of a rat’s eating patterns. The gist: an animal (even us) is more likely to eat large quantities of food if a variety of food choices are present. Ran as a 1/2 pager accompanying the “Science Team 3000” column in Lucky Peach’s Winter 2014 issue.

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THE SPIRITUAL IMPACT OF STREET ART!

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0k4IQ8fDCY