Category Archives: style

20 Frida Kahlo Quotes to Touch the Core of Your Being

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Born Magdalena Carmen Frieda Kahlo y Calderón, she became one of Mexico’s greatest painters.

Kahlo contracted polio at the age of 6, had an almost deadly accident at the age of 18 and went on to marry Diego Rivera, the muralist and ultimate womanizer.

People who are close to me know the immense place that Frida holds in my heart and in my life. For me, she represents the pain every woman on earth is going through—be it physical, or emotional. Frida has proved to us how strong we can be and how much we can endure.

I empathize with the pain she went through. She suffered from the pain of infidelity. Diego, her comrade, her best friend and the first critic of her art, was never her husband or ‘hers’–-as Frida says. He belonged to many women and mostly he belonged to himself only. This—in return—sent Frida through endless, dire suffering that only the pages of her diary witnessed.

When it comes to art, I am fond of many artists. But never before have I witnessed emotions and thoughts expressed so bluntly and poignantly on a canvas. Not only does Kahlo’s art fascinate me, but also her words. Reading what she said, we can sense the intensity of her agony, yet, at the same time, the greatness of her hope.

Having said that, we can say that Frida is an icon of patience, endurance and strength:

“Feet, what do I need you for when I have wings to fly?”

“There have been two great accidents in my life. One was the trolley, and the other was Diego. Diego was by far the worst.”

“I paint self-portraits because I am so often alone, because I am the person I know best.”

“I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me, too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it’s true I’m here, and I’m just as strange as you.”

“You didn’t understand what I am. I am love. I am pleasure. I am essence. I am an idiot. I am alcoholic. I am tenacious. I am. I simply am. You are a sh*t my love.”

“They thought I was a Surrealist, but I wasn’t. I never painted dreams. I paint my own reality.”

“Nothing is absolute. Everything changes, everything moves, everything revolves, everything flies and goes away.”

“I drank because I wanted to drown my sorrows, but now the damned things have learned to swim.”

“I am not sick. I am broken. But I am happy to be alive as long as I can paint.”

“I think that little by little I’ll be able to solve my problems and survive.”

“At the end of the day, we can endure much more than we think we can.”

“I love you more than my own skin.”

“How can I call him my Diego? He never was and never will be mine, he only belongs to himself.”

“Nothing is worth more than laughter. It is strength to laugh and to abandon oneself, to be light.”

“Take a lover who looks at you like maybe you are magic.” ~ Marty McConnel (about Frida Kahlo)

“The only thing I know is that I paint because I need to, and I paint whatever passes through my head without any other consideration.”

“I cannot speak of Diego as my husband because that term, when applied to him, is an absurdity. He never has been, nor will he ever be, anybody’s husband.”

“I leave you my portrait so that you will have my presence all the days and nights that I am away from you.”

“I want to be inside your darkest everything.”

“I hope the exit is joyful and I hope never to return.”

“… and I hope never to return.”  Written on the last pages of her diary, Frida bluntly affirms she has no intentions of reincarnating in another lifetime. Her pain was too great to want to experience physical life again. She physically left Diego, her lovers and her friends. But up until today, Frida is still here. She lives in every painting of hers, in every portrait hung on the wall. She lives in the spirit of every woman who is going through miscarriage, physical pain and emotional difficulties.

Frida gives us the hope that we will overcome any calamity we might face. She tells us to laugh, to love hard, to survive no matter what. Frida shows us the importance of drinking tequila, lighting a cigarette and living as if we are dying tomorrow.

Frida kahlo, a woman, an icon, forever in our hearts.

Viva La Frida!

http://www.elephantjournal.com/2015/12/20-frida-kahlo-quotes-to-touch-the-core-of-your-being/

MARTIAL RAYSSE UNDERGROUND POP ARTISTE SINCE 1936

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Artist biography

French painter. He was a self-taught artist. His early works were assemblages which included plastic objects. This appropriation of prefabricated materials led to his association with Nouveau réalisme. Raysse exhibited a world, new, antiseptic and modern. His approach anticipated that of the Pop artists, who likewise used objects and images deriving from advertising.During the 1960s Raysse began to make more pictorial compositions, based on images from advertising as well as on high art. He also produced paintings in which a deliberate roughness of execution is emphasised by the superimposition of a single neon line. Raysse began at this time to create his own prototypes as another way of continuing to elevate bad taste and falsity to the level of art.

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In the mid 1960s Raysse’s work developed around a number of recurrent themes; in particular he concentrated on the contours of aportrait, a mouth or an eye, repeating them endlessly using all kinds of visual formulae, and drawing on the most diverse types of materials.

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He gave up his pictorial explorations in the atmosphere of the events of 1968 in France. When he returned to painting, his work had undergone an important change. Little by little he moved away from the urban world towards a return to nature, a bucolic ideal of a gentle and calm community with reminiscences of Poussin and of mythology. He used pastel and tempera to depict timeless magical or fantastic scenes, anticipating the vogue for mythological subjects that appeared in the work of other painters in the 1980s.

Here is an outline of his beautiful work for my beautiful humans 

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Sending LOVE LOVE & more LOVE

Mélika Emira Baccouche

Anna Lomax The Queen Of Kitsch!!

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Anna Lomax

Maker and collector, working within the field of Creative Direction and Set Design from still life through to large scale sculptural installation.

Born and bred in South London and currently working in East London, fascinated by the bizarre and off-key, pop-culture, folk art, pound shops and collecting. Intrigued by inventions, colour, movement and scale. Celebrating a sense of playfulness and humour through placing unlikely objects, textures and colours in to new environments.

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JIM O RAW COOL ART

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James O’Raw is a screen print artist based in East London. He works inbetween London and Birmingham where he is a member of Birmingham Printmakers Studio. He works closely with ‘People of Print’ and specialises in CMYK process printing using fluorescent inks and glow in the dark pigments. James is one half of Bridge Unltd which is a t-shirt printing company who use eco friendly discharge inks.

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http://printclublondon.com/artist/jim-o-raw/

THE BEAUTY OF A WOMAN

“The beauty of a woman is not in the clothes she wears, the figure that she carries, or the way she combs her hair. The beauty of a woman is seen in her eyes, because that is the doorway to her heart, the place where love resides. True beauty in a woman is reflected in her soul. It’s the caring that she lovingly gives, the passion that she shows & the beauty of a woman only grows with passing years.” Audrey Hepburn


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THE GODDESS COMES IN MANY FORMS

From the beautiful movie “Ponyo” a Japanese animation directed by Hayao Miyazaki!

He has made many of my favourite movies. A common theme is true love, with innocence and the spirit world. I love his images, truly inspirational art in every way. It doesn’t matter how old you are, magic is all around and we all need a little magic in our every day lives!!!

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IRAN BEFORE THE REVOLUTION!

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From 1941 to 1979, Iran was ruled by King Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the Shah.

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Due to Iran’s large supply of oil, proximity to India, and shared border with the Soviet Union, Britain and the US fully backed the Iranian government.

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Due to Iran’s large supply of oil, proximity to India, and shared border with the Soviet Union, Britain and the US fully backed the Iranian government.

Communists and religious members of society disliked the Shah and his pro-Western government. In 1953, the Shah had to flee Iran after a Western-backed coup to overthrow Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Mosaddegh failed. A second coup succeeded in overthrowing Mosaddegh, who wanted to nationalize the Iranian oil industry to Britain’s chagrin, and the Shah returned to the country. Reza Shah undertook a series of reforms aimed at turning Iran into a modern westernized nation.

Part of Iran’s method of achieving this was through the banning of veils in public.

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Women and men mixed freely, and educational opportunities were greatly extended. Western clothing and norms also became ingrained into large segments of the Iranian population.

Leading the charge for westernization was the Iranian royal family. Pictured below is Empress Soraya.

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FULL ARTICLE AND 26 PICTURES GO TO: http://www.businessinsider.com/iran-before-the-revolution-in-photos-2015

LOOKING AT BOTH SIDES OF THE FENCE I DECIDED TO GO ON WIKIPEDIA 🙂 

“The Iranian Revolution (also known as the Islamic Revolution or the 1979 Revolution; Persian: انقلاب اسلامی, Enghelābe Eslāmi or انقلاب بیست و دو بهمن) refers to events involving the overthrow of the Pahlavi dynasty under Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, who was supported by the United States [10] and its eventual replacement with an Islamic republic under the Grand Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the leader of the revolution, supported by various leftist and Islamic organizations and Iranian student movements.

Demonstrations against the Shah commenced in October 1977, developing into a campaign of civil resistance that was of a religious nature (but with secular elements) and which intensified in January 1978.[15] Between August and December 1978 strikes and demonstrations paralyzed the country. The Shah left Iran for exile on January 16, 1979, as the last Persian monarch, leaving his duties to a regency council and an opposition-based prime minister. Ayatollah Khomeini was invited back to Iran by the government, and returned to Tehran to a greeting by several million Iranians.[18] The royal reign collapsed shortly after on February 11 when guerrillas and rebel troops overwhelmed troops loyal to the Shah in armed street fighting, bringing Khomeini to official power. Iran voted by national referendum to become an Islamic Republic on April 1, 1979, and to approve a new theocratic-republican constitution whereby Khomeini became Supreme Leader of the country, in December 1979.

The revolution was unusual for the surprise it created throughout the world:[24] it lacked many of the customary causes of revolution (defeat at war, a financial crisis, peasant rebellion, or disgruntled military),occurred in a nation that was enjoying relatively good material wealth and prosperity,produced profound change at great speed,was massively popular, resulted in the exile of many Iranians, and replaced a pro-Western semi-absolute monarchy with an anti-Western authoritarian theocracy based on the concept of Guardianship of the Islamic Jurists (or velayat-e faqih). It was a relatively non-violent revolution, and helped to redefine the meaning and practice of modern revolutions (although there was violence in its aftermath).

Its outcome – an Islamic Republic “under the guidance of a religious scholar from Qom” – was, as one scholar put it, “clearly an occurrence that had to be explained

Causes:

Reasons advanced for the occurrence of the revolution and its populist, nationalist and, later, Shi’a Islamic character include a conservative backlash against the Westernizing and secularizing efforts of the Western-backed Shah,[32] a liberal backlash to social injustice,[33] a rise in expectations created by the 1973 oil revenue windfall and an overly ambitious economic program, anger over a short, sharp economic contraction in 1977–78,[34] and other shortcomings of the previous regime.

The Shah’s regime became increasingly oppressive, brutal, corrupt, and extravagant. It also suffered from basic functional failures that brought economic bottlenecks, shortages, and inflation. The Shah was perceived by many as beholden to — if not a puppet of — a non-Muslim Western power (the United States) whose culture was affecting that of Iran. At the same time, support for the Shah may have waned among Western politicians and media – especially under the administration of U.S. President Jimmy Carter – as a result of the Shah’s support for OPEC petroleum price increases earlier in the decade.[41] When President Carter enacted a human-rights policy which said countries guilty of human-rights violations would be deprived of American arms or aid, this helped give some Iranians the courage to post open letters and petitions in the hope that the repression by the government might subside.

That the revolution replaced the monarchy of Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi with Islamism and Khomeini, rather than with another leader and ideology, is credited in part to the spread of the Shia version of the Islamic revival that opposed Westernization and saw Ayatollah Khomeini as following in the footsteps of the Shi’a Imam Husayn ibn Ali and the Shah in the role of Husayn’s foe, the hated tyrant Yazid I. Other factors include the underestimation of Khomeini’s Islamist movement by both the Shah’s reign – who considered them a minor threat compared to the Marxists and Islamic socialists– and by the secularist, opponents of the government – who thought the Khomeinists could be sidelined.”-https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iranian_Revolution

MOROCCAN HIPSTERS

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A really great selection of Hassan Hajjaj a Moroccan photographer and stylist.

I love his imperfect images of real characters that you do meet when you travel around the globe. These characters are the real people that do start fashion trends. The detailed frame of the most popular canned food, candy or powdered dye. I’m assuming something culturally specific to the country is a really nice cheeky add to the images!!

Enjoy!!

Melika Emira Baccouche

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/12/hassan-hajjaj-portraits_n_5807750.html